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NNPC Approves Aramco’s Bid to Challenge Dangote Refinery

Saudi Aramco is mulling investment in Nigeria, says NNPC, the country’s state hydrocarbon company and the most influential entity in the West African oil patch.

NNPC is keen on having Saudi Aramco invest in the Nigerian midstream, but the important part of the story is that the Saudi state firm wants to use NNPC as a platform to supply West Africa with gasoline, says Mele Kyari, the NNPC chief executive.

And the NNPC, surprisingly, doesn’t mind. The two parties are holding talks on potential cooperation.
Teams from NNPC and ADNOC, which is the UAE’s state hydrocarbon firm, have also met in Abu Dhabi to discuss investment opportunities that could range from upstream to midstream to downstream, Kyari told reporters at a recent industry event in Fujairah in the UAE.

Mr. Kyari doesn’t see a problem with the Nigerian state owned oil firm, having an agreement with a Saudi Oil Company to supply gasoline into West Africa, at the time a Nigerian owned business entity is at a significant stage of construction of a large refinery, to produce gasoline and other products, with focus on the West African market. The Dangote Refinery, the largest single train in the world, will cost between 9 and 11 Billion US Dollars, according to estimates.  Instead, the NNPC CEO gushes:  “Aramco is quite keen on getting the opportunity to supply gasoline to West Africa and we will provide them with the right platform.” Mr. Kyari also adds: “We are the largest importer of gasoline in West Africa. It is a clear opportunity for them.”


Gasoline, Diesel Prices, Keep Going Up in South Africa

Petrol prices, which have increased by almost 15% in South Africa since January this year, look set to increase further in October 2019.

The country’s fuel price is deregulated, which means a hike in crude oil price and a weakening of the local currency, the Rand, directly push prices up.

Those two have happened so far in September 2019, leading to warnings by regulators of an imminent hike of diesel and gasoline prices.

After an initial spike of 20% to above $70 a barrel, the oil price has since retreated, with Brent crude oil currently trading at $63 – compared to $60 before the attack. Saudi output was restored in the week of September 23, to pre-attack levels.

The Rand took a hit amid concerns about a global trade war and broke through the R15/$ level for the first time in three weeks. It was last trading at R15.03.

Based on the latest calculations of the Central Energy Fund, the biggest parastatal in the Department of Energy (DoE) the recent Rand and oil price movements will leave unleaded 95 octane petrol on track for an increase of 19c a litre, while 93 octane petrol could be cut by around 4c. Diesel prices will increase by 24c, and paraffin by the same margin.

 

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