All posts tagged gas


First E&P Exports First Anyala Cargo

First oil has been exported from Yinson Holding’s Abigail-Joseph floating production, storage and offloading (FPSO) vessel, which is moored on the Anyala and Madu fields, in OMLs 83 and 85, in shallow offshore Nigeria.

Yinson Holding says that exports began on January 10, 2021, praising its operations team for making this possible.

The FPSO is the company’s fourth facility offshore Nigeria and its first integrated greenfield oil and gas project, the company says.

The vessel left Singapore on February 26, 2020, and achieved first oil in Nigeria on October 28, 2020, marking the start of a firm charter for the vessel, which will run for seven years, with options for another eight.

Production began from the Anyala West field, on OML 83, with five development wells. Yinson has noted the speed with which it accomplished its work. It reached first oil within 20 months of signing the contract with local company First Exploration and Petroleum. Nigerian National Petroleum Corp. (NNPC) is in a joint venture with First E&P, which operates the OMLs.

The Abigail-Joseph was previously in service in Gabon. It was deployed on the Olowi field as the Allan FPSO.

 


John Anis is M&P’s New Chairman of the Board

Maurel et Prom (M&P) has announced the appointment of John Anis as Chairman of the Board of Directors

He is the second Chairman since the company, originally a French owned independent, was bought over by Pertamina, the Indonesian state hydrocarbon company.

“He replaces Aussie Gautama, who wished to step down from his positions”, the company statement declares. Mr. Gautama spent four years as Chairman.

Anis’s daytime job is President Director at Pertamina Internasional EP. “He has more than 25 years of experience in the oil industry, in particular holding senior positions at TOTAL E&P Indonesie and the Indonesian group Pertamina”, the statement explains. “He will bring his vision and knowledge to support M & P’s development, working closely with Olivier de Langavant, Chief Executive Officer”.

M & P is a key natural gas producer in Tanzania. It is one of the largest shareholders in Seplat, the leading Nigerian independent and a sizeable producer of crude oil in Gabon.

 


Ororo-1 Well Fire Rages On

Fire is still raging on the Ororo-1 well, in shallow water Oil Mining Lease (OML) 95, eight full months after a blowout occurred on the Hydraulic Work over rig Grace-1 HWU.

The rig was involved in re-entry operations on the well, located in shallow water Oil Mining Lease (OML) 95.

Although the company that engaged the services of the owners of Grace-1 HWU was Guarantee Petroleum, a Nigerian E&P independent, the Nigerian government, having revoked the rights of the company to the field, took ownership of controlling the well fire.

The Department of Petroleum Resources (DPR), last May, told Africa Oil+Gas Report it would do all it could to extinguish the fire, including possibly drilling a relief well and engaging Boots & Coots Services, a Halliburton owned firm of well control specialists, to put out the fire.

Grace-1 HWU, a Hydraulic workover rig reportedly owned by Joeny Holdings, was contracted by Guarantee Petroleum, for the job of re-entry and completion.

Ororo Fire, in May 2020

The operations experienced a sudden rush of hydrocarbon fluids speeding up from over pressured reservoirs at depths deeper than 8,500 feet to the surface and forcing a blowout. The Blow Out Preventer (BOP) for the main well bore and the BOP for the annulus (the space between the pipe and the skin of the well), both failed. The reservoir pressure was 8,000 pounds per square inch (psi) and above, surface pressure was about 4,600psi as of the time of incident, according to field data.

It’s a widely held view, by a range of technical specialists in the industry, that such a highly pressured well should not have been re-entered with a workover rig which has less than adequate BOP. Competency. Some argue that there should have been a sidetrack and not a re-entry, but if there had to be a re-entry, it should have been done with a rig with at least two horsepower BOP. Indeed, Chevron had plugged the well with a steel plug during abandonment in 1982, because of the pressure challenges.

DPR indeed claims that Guarantee did not actually obtain a permit for re-entry, dismissing the claims of Guarantee Petroleum, that it engaged with DPR personnel before it deployed the equipment.

What is uncertain is why the fire has been left for so long, with clear environmental consequences.
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ENEL Connects New 144MW Wind Farm to S. A. National Grid

Italian power provider ENEL, has connected a wind farm in South Africa’s Eastern Cape to the country’s national grid.

The 144MW Nxuba wind farm was completed last November and will be supported by a 20-year power supply agreement with Eskom, the South African energy utility, as part of the South African government’s Renewable Energy Independent Power Producer Procurement Programme (REIPPPP) tender.

ENEL operates in South Africa as ENEL Green Power RSA (EGP RSA) and has a total of eight operational projects in the country, with installed capacity of 650MW.

South Africa leads the continent in renewable energy capacity, with close to 4,000MW of Wind and Solar power connected to the national grid since 2014.

 

 


Ghana Installs a Floating Solar Power Plant in a Hydroelectric Dam

Ghanaian authorities have inaugurated a floating solar power plant built in the reservoir of the hydroelectric dam in Bui, in north-eastern Ghana. The 5 MW plant is the first phase of a project to support the hydropower installation with a 250 MW solar system.

The second phase of the solar plant is under construction.

The Bui Hydroelectric dam has the capacity to produce 400MW of electricity. When the solar hybridization is completed, it will be able to output 650MW.

The Bui Power Authority (BPA) is the body responsible for managing this facility.

In times of drought, the solar power plant should complement the production of the dam, which drops as the flow of the Volta Noire river drops. According to Afare Apeadu Donkor, the chairman of the board of directors (PCA) of BPA, construction work on the second phase of the project, in addition to the new floating solar power plant, is “progressing”.

 


Shell Sells OML 17 To Elumelu… Less than Half of What He Wanted

By Toyin Akinosho

Tony Elumelu wanted badly to purchase Shell &Co’s stakes in Oil Mining Leases (OMLs) 11 and 17.

Last Friday, January 15, 2021, Shell announced it had completed the sale of Shell &Co (meaning Shell, TOTAL and ENI)’s 45% interest in OML 17 to TNOG Oil and Gas Limited, a company controlled by the tycoon.

But the UK-Dutch major didn’t mention OML 11, whose operation it is no longer in control of.

TNOG, “a related company of Heirs Holdings Limited and Transnational Corporation of Nigeria Plc (Transcorp)”, had paid $453Million at completion, with the balance to be paid over an agreed period”, Shell said in the release. The balance is $80Milion.

$533Million appears to be a lot of money to be paid for OML 17 at this point in time, considering how the deal has travelled. The acreage, located north of Port Harcourt, the commercial hub of the Niger Delta region, contains such iconic Shell operated fields as Agbada, Obigbo, Obigbo North, as well as Otamini and Umuchem. It currently produces up to 20,000Barrels of Oil Per Day (20,000BOPD) and hosts facilities that can output 150,000BOPD. Gas production is less than 50Million standard cubic feet per day (50MMscf/d).

As far back as late 2016, Shell had demanded $1.2Billion for 45% interest in OMLs 11 and 17, a process constrained by the fact that the two licences were close to their expiry dates. In 2017, they were included on the list of 17 acreages that Shell had submitted to the government for renewal. But the Nigerian regulatory agency, Department of Petroleum Resources (DPR), citing the extra-large size of the acreage per its extant regulations, withheld the renewal of OML 11 as it was and proposed to President Muhammadu Buhari, who doubles as the petroleum minister, to carve the tract into three and approve only one for Shell. The President’s office, however, went farther than the request. It withdrew the operatorship of the entire OML 11 from Shell. Renewal of the remaining 16 assets was approved. That singular act dimmed the investment prospects of the deal that Shell and TNOG were negotiating, as OML 17 is considered the less prospective of the two blocks.

Still, Mr. Elumelu, it would seem, badly wanted to annex an apparently sizeable producing asset to his energy portfolio, which already includes two thermal generating plants and two non-producing hydrocarbon acreages. More crucially, for the businessman, producing assets like OML 17 start their lives with new holders as ongoing cash generating engines, no matter how depleted the fields are or how challenging the operations turn out to be.

Shell, in its release, reported that the completion of the transaction “follows the receipt of all approvals from the relevant authorities of the Federal Government of Nigeria”. Shell also said that it will retain its interest in the Port Harcourt and Residential areas, which fall within the lease area.


The Three – Service Sector- Musketeers of the Energy Transition: The Emerging Energy Value Chain

By Gerard Kreeft

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

All- For-One; One-For-All

Musketeer 1 Oilfield Services

Musketeer 2 New Energy Service Companies

Musketeer 3 Energy Service Companies Africa

There is growing evidence of a new convergence between Musketeer 1 Oilfield Services  and Musketeer 2 New Energy Service Companies. 

Perhaps not so much convergence but cross-overs and falling by the wayside of others and in the process creating new alliances.

Little attention has been paid to Musketeer 3- Energy  Service Companies Africa- perhaps viewed as the junior musketeer, but nonetheless playing a significant role.

Their- All- For-One; One-For-All requires  further explanation.

Peak Oil and What to Anticipate From the Majors

Rystad Energy is a preminent independent energy research and business intelligence company, headquartered in Oslo, Norway.

The COVID-19 pandemic, according to the company, has accelerated the global peak demand for oil to 2028, instead of 2030 and cut peak oil demand to 102Million Barrels Per Day. This corresponds with BP’s peak oil analysis of 2025 and demand of 100MMBOPD.

Nonetheless, Rystad  calculated that oil demand,  in 2020, declined to 89.3MMBOPD, compared with 99.6MMBOPD in 2019. This is now termed “COVID-19 induced demand destruction”.  It is only in 2023 that demand will recover to pre-Covid-19 levels and jump back to 100.1MMBOPD.

There is also little evidence from the oil and gas majors to indicate that there will be a quick recovery. In 2021 the sector’s growth in Africa will be halting and slow:

ExxonMobil: Deepwater Offshore Guyana,  Rovuma LNG Mozambique are the company’s key challenges. Expect little else and no plans on renewables.

Chevron: Only $1.5Billion dedicated to possibly Angola, Equitorial Guinea and Nigeria. Attention is focused on Tengiz, Kazakhstan which is receiving 75% of Chevron’s budget outside the USA. Only fossil-based investments.

Equinor: Attention is largely  being devoted to expanding its offshore windpark capacity, all outside Africa.

ENI: With its large African footprint in Angola, Nigeria and Egypt the company is in prime position to expand its African operations. Green energy plans are being made.

Shell: reducing its oil and gas assets to 9 key hubs which includes Nigeria. Green shoots on the horizon.

TOTAL: its Brulpadda and Liuperd (Leopard) prospects in South Africa, together with its Mozambique LNG project will be the focal points in 2021. Little room for further plans. Green plans play a strategic role.

BP: intends to reduce its oil production by 40% .How will this affect the Greater Tortue Ahmeyim  development in Mauritania and Senegal, its Algerian, Angolan and  Egyptian assets? The first green plans are being unveiled.

Musketeer 1 : Oilfield Services

Global demand for oilfield services (OFS), measured in the total value of exploration and production (E&P) company spending, has in 2020 dropped a massive 25% as a result of the Covid-19 caused oil demand destruction, According to Rystad.

Spending in 2020 is at year’s end expected  to be $481Billion and take the first step to recovery will take place in 2021.

“The recovery will accelerate further in 2022 and 2023, with OFS spending by E&Ps reaching some $552Billion and $620Billion, respectively. Despite the boost, purchases will not return to the pre-COVID-19 levels of $639Billion achieved in 2019.”

 

Audun Martinsen, Rystad Energy’s Head of Energy Research, argues that the comeback will not be visible across all OFS segments. Well services and the pressure pumping market will be the first to see a boost, while other markets will need to get further depressed before recovering.

“Despite the recovery in oil prices, it will take many quarters before all segments of the supply chain see their revenues deliver consistent growth. In case of an upturn, operators would prefer flexible budget items with production increments and high-return investments with short pay-back times. Therefore, we expect well service segments to be the first to recover, while long-lead segments will pick up much later.“

  • Maintenance and operations: is poised for consecutive yearly rises in the next three years after slumping to $167Billion this year from $202Billion in 2019.
  • Well services and commodities: is set for a similar recovery, but only after slumping to $152Billion in 2020 from $231Billion in 2019 – the biggest decline among segments in absolute numbers.
  • Drilling contractors: falling to $46Billion in 2020 from $62Billion in 2019, and then rising to $57Billion in 2023.
  • Subsea segment: will fall from $25Billion in 2019 to $22Billion in 2021 – before starting to rebound to $24Billion in 2022 and to $29Billion in 2023.
  • EPCI: fell to $81Billion in 2020 from $105Billion in 2019, sliding further to $74Billion in 2021, before rising back to $81Billion in 2022 and growing to $106Billion a year later.
  • Seismic: declined to $12Billion in 2020 from $15Billion in 2019, dropping to $10Billion in 2021, before rebounding to $11Billion in 2022 and to $13Billion a year later.

The Players- BakerHughes, Halliburton and Schlumberger

Baker Hughes, Halliburton and Schlumberger, the traditional giants of the service providers, have experienced a long trek through the wilderness. Is relief on the way? A mixed bag.

Their stock prices have tanked: in December 2016 Baker Hughes’s share price was $65, now December 2020, it was $21; Schlumberger in December 2016 was $85, December 2020 it had dropped to $21; Halliburton in December 2016 was $55; in  December 2020 it was $19.

81,000 jobs have been lost since November 2019, to go by the report of the Petroleum Equipment and Services Association  (PESA).  In a recent forum PESA President Leslie Beyer stated: “The majors are making carbon reduction and setting net zero goals. Then they’re turning to their OFS sector partners and saying, ‘How are you going to help us get there?’”.  How indeed!

The strategies of both Halliburton and Schlumberger are defensive and show little reason for optimism:

Halliburton on its website talks about further digalization of its services, lower capital intensity and being committed to provide technologies that reduce emissions/environmental footprint.

Olivier Le Peuch, Schlumberger’s CEO, recently announced a major strategic restructuring creating four new divisions- Digital & Integration, Production Systems, Well Construction, Reservoir Performance.

Within the confines of the E&P bubble both major service companies continue on with what they anticipate what the IOCs (International Oil Companies) are dictating: belt tightening, a reduced head count, with the hope for a better tomorrow. Simply re-shuffling the deck chairs on the Titanic.

The one exception is Baker Hughes who has recently unveiled a forward looking strategy focused on CCS (Carbon Capture Storage), Hydrogen, and Energy Storage. Key themes for the Energy Transition.

The Drillers

Hans Hagelberg, Bassoe Offshore, has estimated that in the last 12 months the offshore rig fleet has lost almost 42%, or $30Billion of its total value. A large portion of the global fleet is now cold stacked. Of the 103 cold stacked, 94 have been stacked for 12 months or longer.

West Africa has been one of the hardest hit areas in 2020, according to IHS Markit: the region saw 11 contract cancellations from March to July 2020, the most of any area. Most of those cancellations were associated with jackups.

Jackup utilization in West Africa fell from 71% in September 2019 to 29% in September 2020, while drillship utilization fell from 48% to an abysmal 19% in the same time frame, according to Bassoe.

Dayrates for drillships in West Africa are currently between $150,000 and $200,000 per day, while jackups currently sit between $70,000 and $90,000. Looking to 2021, Teresa Wilkie, Offshore Rig Market Analyst, Bassoe,  rig utilization in West Africa is likely to stay flat, unless there is a marked increase in oil demand. With rig oversupply set to continue in the region, she expects dayrates to remain at the same level in 2021; further reductions are unlikely as the current rates are around operating cost level.

Marine Contractors- Two  key players- TechnipFMC & Heerema

Marine contractors have not been sitting idle. They are demonstrating adaptation and innovation.

The 2017 merger of Technip and FMC featured distinct market segments: subsea, onshore and offshore and surface projects. Now Technip Energies- entailing LNG, sustainable chemistry and decarbonization- is being spun off, creating new innovative options.

Arnaud Pieton, President and CEO of Technip Energies, says that the company is well placed to produce green hydrogen, given  that some  270 plants worldwide have their origin with TechnipFMC.  A strategic alliance with McPhy, a builder of electrolyzers, is expected to help enhance the production of green hydrogen. 

Heerema, which had its own enormous fabrication yard in Angola,  recently announced that it shut down operations citing poor  market conditions and sustained low oil price.  Instead the company is investing in the Offshore Wind Sector.

Heerema Marine Contractors recently signed a contract  to support the construction of the Changhua Windfarm Phase 1 project, Offshore Taiwan. Heerema will take on the installation of 21 jacket foundations (4 legged) for the Changhua project.

Musketeer 2 New Energy Service Companies

Siemens Energy

Siemens Energy has operations in 90 countries offering a full project cycle of services: generation, transmission and storage from conventional to renewable energy. Two examples:

  • Service center and a training academy in Egypt. The service center is the first of its kind in the region, combining a repair center, a tooling center and a spare-parts warehouse under one roof; and
  • Siemens Energy will supply six SGT-800 industrial gas turbines to the Mozambique LNG Project that will be used for low-emissions onsite power generation.

Cummins

Cummins operates in 51 countries in Africa and market leader in fuel cell and hydrogen production technologies. Cummins began developing its fuel cell capabilities more than 20 years ago.

In 2019 Cummins purchased Hydrogenics, a leader in hydrogen technology. This accelerated Cummins’ ability to further innovate and scale hydrogen fuel cell technologies across a range of commercial markets.

Two examples of Cummins’s presence in Africa:

  • Cummins Angola operations, which is a joint venture partnership with Angolan ProjectNet. Cummins Angola currently occupies 1,000-square meters of office and parts outlet space, as well as 1,750-square meters of rehousing.  Cummins is working closely with the Angolan government to maximize the Private Public Partnership Framework to invest in the energy sector.
  • Cummins has supplied a power solution based around four of its 630 kVA generator sets to Standard Chartered Bank in Ghana. The system will provide the bank’s head office in Accra with standby power whenever interruptions to the grid supply require it.

ITM Power

ITM Power Plc designs and manufactures products which generate hydrogen gas, based on Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) technology. This technology only uses electricity (renewable) and tap water to generate hydrogen gas on-site and can be scaled  up to 100MW+ in size.

Two examples:

  • The REFHYNE project to be installed and operated at the world’s largest hydrogen electrolyser at the Shell Rhineland Refinery in Wesseling, Germany.The PEM electrolyser, built by ITM Power, will be the largest of its kind to be deployed on a large industrial scale.
  • HyDeploy the £6.8Million project, funded by Ofgem and led by Cadent and Northern Gas Networks, UK, is an energy trial to establish the potential for blending up to 20% hydrogen into the normal gas supply to reduce carbon dioxide emissions. HyDeploy will run a year-long live trial of blended gas on part of the University of Keele gas network to determine the level of hydrogen which could be used by gas consumers safely and with no changes to their behaviour or existing domestic appliances. ITM Power is supplying the electrolyser system.

Musketeer 3: Energy Service Companies Africa

Musketeer 3 has huge challenges if Africa is to be lit up by 2025. The African Development Bank envisages:

  • 160 GW of new capacity for On-grid generation;
  • 130Million new connections for On-grid transmission and grid connections;
  • 75Million connections for Off-grid generation, an increase 29 times more than what Africa generates today;
  • Access to clean cooking energy for 130Million households.

There is a strong need to enhance the capability of Musketeer 3- Energy Service Companies Africa- to build coalitions across the sector and the region,  including the oil and gas and the renewable sector.

Some examples

  • Clean Energy Corridor which aims to support integration of cost-effective renewable power options to national systems, promote its cross-border trade and support creation of regional markets for renewable energy. The Clean Energy Corridor initiative has two African components:   (1.) African  Clean Energy Corridor(ACEC) for the member countries of Eastern and Southern African power pools.  (2.) West African Clean Energy Corridor(WACEC) within the Economic Community of West African States.
  • Partners should also include National Governments and their National Power Companies, including companies from Asia, Europe, the Americas, and the Middle East.
  • Finally this should include the oil and gas sector accustomed to carrying out large -scale projects. Providing them an opportunity to participate and be a partner in renewable energy.

The increased speed of the Energy Transition is not necessarily good news for Africa. The greening of Europe by the  majors could  mean reducing oil and  gas activities in Africa.

Why? Simply because the oil and gas majors are choosing  low carbon prospects and natural gas projects on a massive scale  leaving many potential prospects in doubt. Other smaller oil and gas projects will not be treated so kindly.

How will oil and gas prospects in Africa be judged? Do the various governments have the management skills to properly assess their energy scenarios?

Do they have the technical knowledge, capability and expertise to manage and implement oil and gas projects?

Then there is the matter of developing national service companies which have the technical capacity and knowledge to implement projects.

Conclusions

  1. Musketeer 1- Oilfield Services is in the sunset of his youth. Oilfield Services will continue but in a diminished marketplace. With the majors cutting back their oil and gas investments there is little room for optimism. Halliburton and Schlumberger must seriously re-examine their energy scenarios. Baker Hughes is showing investors that they have a Plan B.  Also the marine contractors- both TechnipFMC and Heerema- are making bold energy transition moves.
  2. Musketeer 2- New Energy Service Companies are defining the energy transition. Siemens Energy, Cummins and ITM Power are examples of new companies delivering energy systems for a renewable world.
  3. Musketeer 3- Energy Service Companies Africa could well become an alliance of national oil and gas companies, power companies and service companies in order to meet the requirements of the energy transition. They could well receive assistance from Musketeer 2-New Energy Service Companies.

Gerard Kreeft, BA (Calvin University, Grand Rapids, USA) and MA (Carleton University, Ottawa, Canada), Energy Transition Adviser, was founder and owner of EnergyWise.  He has managed and implemented energy conferences, seminars and university master classes in Alaska, Angola, Brazil, Canada, India, Libya, Kazakhstan, Russia and throughout Europe.  Kreeft has Dutch and Canadian citizenship and resides in the Netherlands.  He writes on a regular basis for Africa Oil+ Gas Report.

 

 


Michael Ajukwu Takes the Chairmanship of LEKOIL 

Michael Onochie Ajukwu, a Nigerian businessman, has been named Chairman of LEKOIL Limited, after Metallon Corporation succeeded in getting the three directors it nominated into the company’s board of directors, at the Extraordinary General Meeting (EGM) of the company on January 8 2021.

He takes over from Mark Simmonds, the British diplomat and politician, who had been in the position for just about a year.

Mr. Simmonds is as high profile as they come. He was Britain’s Foreign & Commonwealth Office Minister with responsibilities for Africa, the Caribbean, UK Overseas Territories, International Energy and Conflict Prevention. He served as a Member of the UK Parliament for fourteen (14) years and was also a senior advisor to the then Prime Minister, David Cameron.

Simmonds took over the Chairmanship at a time of huge reputational challenges for LEKOIL: the company’s shares were in a headlong crash in January 2020, after the AIM listed firm discovered that a $184 Million loan it had announced was fraudulent.

But LEKOIL had not been able to live down the smear. And it was one of the issues that Metallon Corporation raised, two months after it bought 15% share of the company and moved in for board changes.

“I am honoured to assume the position of Chairman of LEKOIL and would like to thank my predecessor, Mark Simmonds, for his contributions to the Company”, Ajukwu, known in Lagos  business circles for his closeness to South African brands and Nigerian banking interests, said. “I look forward to working with my colleagues on the Board and the management of LEKOIL to deliver a high performing company anchored on strong governance structures that produces value for all shareholders.”

The path to Mr. Ajukwu’s chairmanship was cleared when Mr. Simmonds chose to step down as Chairman at the EGM and all resolutions that Metallon put to the meeting were duly passed, with Metallon’s nominated directors, including Michael Ajukwu, Thomas Richardson and George Maxwell invited to join the Board with immediate effect.

Mr. Simmonds noted his intention to stand down from board Chairmanship role with immediate effect with a new Chairman to be appointed by the enlarged board of directors.

 


FAR May Not Yet Ride into the Sunset, Afterall

Australian junior FAR Limited has cautioned that the proposed acquisition of all of its shares by Remus Horizons PCC has a dim chance of happening.

“The Remus Proposal terms are uncertain at this stage”, the company declares in a statement early on Friday, January 8, 2021.

The most significant lie in the release goes thus: “The Remus Proposal is conditional on the Woodside Sale not occurring”. Meaning: If FAR’s shareholders agree to sell the company’s 15% stake in Senegal’s Sangomar oilfield development to Woodside, then Remus will not move ahead.

“FAR cautions that the Remus Proposal is not a legally binding offer, there is no certainty that the Remus Proposal will necessarily eventuate, and the Remus Proposal terms are uncertain at this stage”, FAR explains.

“Accordingly, care needs to be used in assessing the Remus Proposal at this time. The Remus Proposal is conditional on the Woodside Sale not occurring”.

FAR says it has obtained further information from Remus in relation to the Remus Proposal as follows:

  • Remus is presently finalising the funding arrangements in advance of making the proposed offer.
  • The only internal and regulatory approval required to proceed with the offer is the final approval of the Remus Board and final review and confirmation of documentation.
  • Remus is presently satisfied that it will not need to undertake any further due diligence on FAR.
  • FIRB approval is not required and any offer made will not be conditional on FIRB approval.
  • Any proposed offer is expected to be subject to a requirement that Remus achieves a controlling interest in FAR together with other customary conditions.

“In these circumstances, FAR has determined to further postpone the shareholder meeting to consider approving the Woodside Sale currently scheduled for 21 January 2021 to 10.00 am on 18 February 2021. This will enable further time for FAR shareholders to see if the Remus Proposal eventuates, if so assess its merits, and consider the Woodside Sale on the basis of more detailed information. FAR will in due course distribute updated meeting information in this regard. FAR is not presently inclined to further postpone the shareholder meeting to consider updates in relation to the Remus Proposal. In the meantime, FAR is continuing to advance negotiations with Woodside in relation to the form of the Woodside Sale proposed contractual documentation following Woodside’s pre-emptive rights exercise. FAR advises that it is in the process of paying the RSSD project November 2020 cash call ($8.96Million plus interest) and the December 2020 cash call

 


Savannah May Get A Trickle of Crude Oil to Zinder Refinery In Niger Republic

Savannah Petroleum intends to commence installation of an Early Production System by the end of financial year (FY) 2021, market conditions and financing permitting, and intends to deliver its initial production of 1,500Barrels Per Day from the R3 East development, to the Zinder refinery in Niger Republic.

“Subsurface work has been progressing well following the completion of our Pre-Stack Depth Migration (PSDM) processing of the R3 East seismic in 2019”, Savannah explains in a release. Savannah has now completed the seismic interpretation of the R3 East area. The PSDM dataset shows an overall improvement in the interpretation of faults and horizons, supported by attributes analysis which has also improved our structural, stratigraphic and sedimentological interpretations. Based on the newly interpreted PSDM, 3D geocellular models have been built for the Amdigh and Eridal discoveries. The resulting oil in place volumes are in line with previously reported estimated figures from the Niger CPR dated April 2020.

Significant further potential on the Savannah PSC areas remains, with 146 further potential exploration targets having been identified for future drilling consideration as Savannah looks to follow up on its highly successful R3 East drilling campaign in 2018, which saw five exploration discoveries from five exploration wells. The R3 East portfolio is currently being re-evaluated based on the newly interpreted PSDM seismic dataset with a focus on the deeper Cretaceous plays.

 

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